If you were to walk into the kitchen on any day, you would find a team of dedicated food people. Executive chef Ryan loves to know all there is to know about food, most recently his passion is for cheese-making, fashioning his own smoked goat’s provolone. Head chef Jamie builds race cars as well as vegie gardens. And when we have visitors in our kitchen they often remark at the youthfulness of the team, yep passionate people who love their trade and the place they live.

Ryan and the team are keen to share their recipes which mean you can easily prepare delicious food using ingredients from your own garden or local purveyors at home and share in the magic of fresh, vibrant food.

Cold Smoked Kingfish (not as complicated as you think!)

You will need:

1 side of kingfish, skin on (you should ask your fish monger for the freshest piece, and South Australian from Port Lincoln if possible)

1 cup brown sugar

1 cup of salt, coarse salt is best because it will penetrate at the same rate as the sugar, we use Murray River pink salt as it has more flavour and nutrition from its extra mineral content

Step 1: Inspect your side of kingfish to ensure it looks fresh and has no obvious blemishes.  Look for pin bones and remove if found.

Step 2: Mix together the sugar and salt and place one third of the mixture into a non-reactive container large enough to hold the fish flat, stainless steel or glass is perfect.

Step 3: Place fish skin side down onto sugar and salt then rub in the remaining cure to the flesh.  Cover with cling film and refrigerate for 48 hours.

Step 4: Rinse fish under cold water to remove excess cure then place in cold water for 30 minutes.  Remove and pat dry.

Step 5: Now we are up to smoking.  We have a few choices here.  If you have a friend who has a smoke house offer some of your fish to them for the use of their smoke house.  If you have a really kind butcher he may also let you throw your fish into his smoke house for a few hours but if you want to do it yourself pick up some wood chips (apple wood is great for fish) from your local hardware store, and grab a small cold smoker as seen in the picture, you can find them online or from a barbeque shop.  Fill the cold smoker with chips and place in a deep pan with enough room to place the fish on a perforated tray above the smoker.  Light the chips at one end and get them smoking well.  Place fish into the container keeping a little distance between it and the smoke and cover tray in alfoil.  At the other end of the tray to the smoker make a little hole in the foil for the smoke to escape.  Every fifteen minutes or so just check to see if the woodchips need to be relit.  Continue until the desired smokiness is achieved.

Let it cool in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight before slicing thinly.  Enjoy as you would smoked salmon.